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Report on Business Six things you need to know today about managing your money

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Managing money well is one of life’s biggest challenges. How can your family get ahead these days? Are you saving for the future? Is your retirement fund growing?

The Globe and Mail can give you an edge in making smart financial decisions. We can help you spot a promising stock, compare your savings with other people your age, and ensure your cash lasts through retirement. Here is a sample of the kind of insight The Globe provides.

Less-volatile investments

If the stock market’s recent volatility is making you queasy, maybe you are investing in the wrong funds. For those who want a quieter ride, consider options that might not stoke the fires of greed but rather dull the pain of market mayhem.

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TFSA calculator

The tax-free savings account, or TFSA, is a wondrous invention. It has become an essential wealth-building tool for Canadians. The Globe created a calculator to show how much your TFSA could be worth. Are you on track?

Paycheque to paycheque

If, like many Canadians, you are in debt, it might make you feel better to know that many high earners are living paycheque-to-paycheque. Why? It has less to do with the high cost of living than it does keeping up with the Joneses and that dopamine hit we get every time we click “Buy.”

How do the rich invest?

To the average investor, how rich people manage their portfolios is likely a mystery. Do they have access to secret investments? Or is it their mindsets? Turns out it’s a little of both. How do the wealthy stay that way? They don’t invest like the rest.

Needlessly frugal

Isn’t it cute when Grandma tucks a $5 bill in your birthday card? Frugality is a common trait of retired people, but it needn’t necessarily be that way. A whole cohort of Canadians are spending below their means and potentially not enjoying life to the fullest in the prime of their retirement. Should they be living it up more?

A ‘wow’ portfolio

Imagine if you bought just 10 Canadian stocks and your little portfolio nearly doubled the returns of the stock market over 18 years. Can you make good money without following the traditional rules of diversification? The answer is yes, in the case of the Canadian Essentials Portfolio.

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