Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism.
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Cancel Anytime
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99per week for the first 24weeks
Just $1.99per week for the first 24weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); } //

A VW logo is seen at the assembly line for the Volkswagen ID 3 electric car of German carmaker Volkswagen, at the 'Glassy Manufactory' production site in Dresden, eastern Germany on June 8, 2021.

JENS SCHLUETER/AFP/Getty Images

Volkswagen AG’s top U.S. executive met with the head of the Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday to talk about electric vehicles and the push toward cleaner cars as the Biden administration works to revise vehicle emissions rules.

Scott Keogh, president and chief executive of Volkswagen Group of America, spoke with EPA Administrator Michael Regan and reaffirmed the company’s support for an emissions deal with California.

Ford Motor Co , Honda Motor Co , Volkswagen and BMW in July 2019 struck a voluntary agreement with California on reducing vehicle emissions through the 2026 model years which would allow them to meet a single nationwide standard.

Story continues below advertisement

General Motors Co on Wednesday threw its support behind the overall emissions reductions in California’s 2019 deal but asked the Biden administration to give automakers more flexibility to hit the carbon reduction target between now and 2026.

Regan has spoken with GM, Stellantis and Toyota Motor Corp executives this week as the EPA plans to announce a proposal to revise the Trump emissions rules.

“It’s clear more automakers now feel the same way and that’s a good thing. We welcome them to the table. Electric mobility for all will only take hold in this country when everyone is all in – industry, state and federal government, consumers,” Keogh said in a statement to Reuters.

The Trump administration in 2020 finalized a rollback of vehicle emissions standards to require 1.5% annual increases in efficiency through 2026, well below the 5% yearly boosts in Obama era rules it discarded.

The Center for Biological Diversity estimates the California deal will improve fuel economy 3.7% year over year between 2022 and 2026.

Former Volkswagen chief to reportedly pay €10-million in damages over diesel emissions scandal

Volkswagen to seek dieselgate damages from former CEO, Audi boss

The largest German automaker has embraced electric vehicles after it came under fire for diesel emissions cheating. Volkswagen said in March it expects half of its U.S. sales by 2030 to be EVs and is spending tens of billions on EVs.

Volkswagen admitted to using illegal software to cheat U.S. pollution tests in 2015, allowing up to 40 times legally allowable emissions and in 2017 pleaded guilty to fraud, obstruction of justice and falsifying statements as part of a $4.3 billion settlement reached with the Justice Department. The scandal has cost VW more than 32 billion euros ($39 billion) so far.

Story continues below advertisement

Be smart with your money. Get the latest investing insights delivered right to your inbox three times a week, with the Globe Investor newsletter. Sign up today.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error
Tickers mentioned in this story
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies