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Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland addresses ambassadors as she speaks during the opening of an ambassadors' conference on Aug. 27, 2018 at the Foreign Ministry in Berlin.

JOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images

The foreign minister of Canada, which is embroiled in a diplomatic row with Saudi Arabia, called for German support on Monday in Ottawa’s campaign to promote human rights around the world.

The German government, trying to repair its own strained relationship with Riyadh, has been silent on the spat between Canada and Saudi Arabia, drawing criticism from some politicians and rights groups.

Chrystia Freeland, speaking at an annual gathering of German ambassadors in Berlin, did not specifically mention Saudi Arabia in her address. However, she touched indirectly on the row which was triggered by her tweet demanding the release of jailed human rights activists in the kingdom.

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Related: Saudi Arabia-Canada spat: What we know so far

In response, Riyadh has frozen new trade with Canada, expelled the Canadian ambassador and ended state-backed educational and medical programmes in Canada.

Freeland said Canada would always stand up for human rights “even when we are told to mind our own business ... and even when speaking up brings consequences”.

She added: “We count on and hope for Germany’s support.”

Ties between Berlin and Riyadh have been strained since former foreign minister Sigmar Gabriel denounced “adventurism” in the Middle East in November of last year, comments that were seen as criticism of Riyadh’s actions in the region.

Saudi Arabia withdrew its ambassador to Berlin and, since early 2018, has excluded German healthcare companies from public tenders.

Riyadh is at loggerheads with many European countries which have criticised its intervention in Yemen’s civil war and support dialogue with its arch-enemy Iran.

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German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas stressed at the conference Europe and Canada’s shared interest in preserving a “rules-based international order” in the face of U.S. President Donald Trump’s unilateralism.

“It hits Europe and Germany when the United States, suddenly and without consulting, introduces random sanctions against Russia, China, Turkey and in the future perhaps more of our important trading partners,” he said.

Europe needed to become more autonomous in order to defend its commercial and trade interests, Maas said. “It won’t be easy,” he added.

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