Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); }

Quebec provincial police say a fourth person has died following Wednesday’s tractor accident in Notre-Dame-de-Stanbridge, southeast of Montreal.

The accident had claimed the lives of three children — all under the age of five — out of a total of 10 people who were thrown from the front loader of a tractor.

Sgt. Claude Denis says today that police were informed Friday night of the death of one of the two adults who had been listed in critical condition earlier this week.

Story continues below advertisement

The condition of the second adult wasn’t immediately available.

Five others — three children and two adults — were also seriously injured in the accident.

A 38-year-old Quebec man was charged with criminal negligence causing death and criminal negligence causing bodily harm during a court appearance on Thursday.

Six children and four adults were riding in the loader of the trailer Wednesday evening when the accident occurred on a country road in the small town of Notre-Dame-de-Stanbridge, about 55 kilometres southeast of Montreal.

The driver of the tractor, who cannot be identified under a court order, appeared in a Granby, Que., courtroom Thursday afternoon and was formally charged with criminal negligence causing death and criminal negligence causing bodily harm.

The suspect was released with conditions.

Police initially said alcohol could have been a factor in the accident. But Crown prosecutor Veronique Gauthier told reporters Thursday that the suspect will not be charged with alcohol-related crimes.

Story continues below advertisement

“We looked at the evidence, and for now, that’s the only count that we could go for,” she said, referring to criminal negligence.

On Thursday morning, skid marks and faded bloodstains were visible on the pavement of Rang Sainte-Anne, the quiet rural road where the incident happened. A Quebec provincial police car was stationed in front of a grey house with a red tin roof.

Several pieces of heavy farm machinery, including tractors, could be seen parked next to the fields adjacent to the house. A hockey net and a children’s play set sat in the backyard.

Luc Perreault, who lives nearby, said he heard police sirens racing through the village just after 7 p.m. and rushed to the end of the road to see what was happening.

“I heard a police car coming into the village full speed with sirens on, and then an ambulance and another police and another police,” he said. He said he saw a parade of ambulances arrive at the scene.

While he said he didn’t know the family, Mr. Perreault said he believed the event was likely a family celebration.

Story continues below advertisement

“A Canada Day that just turned terrible,” he said.

Provincial police said a farm tractor was carrying 10 people inside its front loader, along with pieces of wood. Police spokeswoman Anik Lamirande said that for unknown reasons, all the occupants were suddenly thrown from the loader shortly before 7 p.m.

She could not say if the 10 people were related.

Mr. Perreault said it’s rare but not unheard of for people to ride in the loader of a tractor. “We used to do that when we were kids, you know, with grandpa’s old tractor sometimes, get in the bucket,” he said. “But not to that magnitude, so many people.”

He said the small community of fewer than 700 people is devastated.

“Nobody is smiling this morning,” he said. “It’s three kids that are gone, two adults seriously hurt.”

Story continues below advertisement

Daniel Tetreault, the town’s mayor, said the entire community was saddened by the accident, which he said involved a local farming family.

While he said doesn’t know the family well, Mr. Tetreault said they are hard-working people who raise crops.

“They’re not people who are known in town for causing trouble,” he said in an interview. “If there’s a repair to do, they’ll ask for permits, they do everything according to the law,” he said in an interview outside his house.

“They’re a good family, good people.”

Lewis Smith, manager of national projects for the Canada Safety Council, said accidents involving children and heavy farm machinery are “more common than (they) should be.”

He said it’s easy for families to look at an incident like Wednesday’s as an isolated tragedy that likely won’t happen to them. That’s the wrong approach, he said.

Story continues below advertisement

“Nobody ever goes out with the intent of having this happen,” Mr. Smith said.

“It’s unintentional, it’s sudden, it’s irreversible. When you’re considering letting children climb into the bucket and driving them around for a bit, you have to stop and be mindful of whether you can live with the consequences.”

Our Morning Update and Evening Update newsletters are written by Globe editors, giving you a concise summary of the day’s most important headlines. Sign up today.

Follow related topics

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Comments are closed

We have closed comments on this story for legal reasons or for abuse. For more information on our commenting policies and how our community-based moderation works, please read our Community Guidelines and our Terms and Conditions.

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies