Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism.
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); } //

Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou, seen here leaving her Vancouver home to attend a court hearing on Sept. 29, 2020, was arrested by RCMP on a U.S. extradition request in late 2018 while transiting through Vancouver International Airport.

DARRYL DYCK/The Canadian Press

A Canadian prosecutor has urged the judge deciding whether Huawei Technologies executive Meng Wanzhou should be extradited to the U.S. not to spend time on defence arguments that have nothing to do with the extradition case.

Crown lawyer Robert Frater said lawyers for Ms. Meng are trying to turn the extradition proceedings into a trial on the U.S. charges and he urged Associate Chief Justice Heather Holmes to resist those efforts.

“Your duty here … is not to let this proceeding become a trial, not to admit expert evidence on causality in U.S. sanctions law to force us to file responding evidence so that you can decide an issue on which, with greatest respect, you have no expertise,” Mr. Frater said.

Story continues below advertisement

He told Justice Holmes that as an extradition judge, she should keep these proceedings moving quickly and refuse to spend precious court time on legal arguments that have no hope of succeeding.

Ms. Meng, 48, was arrested by RCMP on a U.S. extradition request in late 2018 while transiting through Vancouver International Airport. She is accused of misrepresenting Huawei’s relationship with a subsidiary based in Iran, called Skycom, during a 2013 PowerPoint presentation to HSBC, putting the bank at risk of violating U.S. sanctions against Iran.

The defence argued Monday the U.S. authorities omitted key facts of Ms. Meng’s presentation to HSBC and that Ms. Meng and Huawei had given the bank all the information needed to assess the risk. Defence lawyer Frank Addario told the judge Tuesday that the U.S. describes the PowerPoint presentation as the “cornerstone of its case,” yet only describes part of the presentation in its case summary.

Instead, Mr. Addario said additional slides show that Ms. Meng clearly described the Huawei and Skycom relationship as one of partners that both did business in Iran. The bank had the information it needed to navigate trade laws, he argued.

But Mr. Frater called the PowerPoint “cheap documents” that need to be put in context. He said the PowerPoint presentation was used to persuade HSBC to continue the relationship with Huawei and to distance Huawei from Skycom.

Justice Holmes is considering whether to allow the defence team to present an argument next year that Ms. Meng was the victim of an abuse of process because they allege the United States misled Canadian officials in its summary of allegations. The defence is also asking the court to admit further evidence to support that claim.

But Mr. Frater said an extradition hearing is not the place for that: Evidence that establishes a defence or an alternative inference of what happened does not meet the test of relevance for an extradition hearing. He urged Justice Holmes to dismiss the defence team’s motion.

Story continues below advertisement

“It falls to you to try to keep these proceedings on the straight and narrow,” Mr. Frater told Justice Holmes.

We have a weekly Western Canada newsletter written by our B.C. and Alberta bureau chiefs, providing a comprehensive package of the news you need to know about the region and its place in the issues facing Canada. Sign up today.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow the author of this article:

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies