Skip to main content

If you are overspending, shopping with your spouse could be the reason. We spend 38 per cent more when grocery shopping with our partner, according to Martin Lindstrom, author of Buyology: Truth and Lies About Why We Buy.

We also spend 30 per cent more when we have our kids in tow. As anyone who has gone shopping with children knows, mini-carts and the placement of kid-friendly items at eye level are prime reasons we splurge on dinosaur-egg oatmeal and cheese strings.

Using a shopping cart isn't great for adults, either. Carts continue to grow in size because retailers know that the bigger the cart, the more we'll put in it. It's best to skip the four-wheelers and use a basket or, even better, your arms. If you're shopping for a family of five and need the cart, create a list and stick to it. Considering that up to 70 per cent of the groceries we buy are things we didn't originally intend to purchase, a list is crucial. Keep in mind that the most expensive items are at eye level. Take a peek at the shelves below eye level for better deals on similar items.

Story continues below advertisement

And when you're ready to check out, beeline it for the aisle without magazines or treats. The last five minutes before checkout, you are standing in the "zone of seduction," leading to more unnecessary impulse buys, as Mr. Lindstrom puts it.

Another reason to keep your items in your arms: It's hard to pick up chocolate-covered raisins and O magazine with your hands full of bread and milk.



Angela Self is one of the founders of the Smart Cookies money group.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter