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Notley attacks Kevin O’Leary’s offer to pay $1-million for her to quit

Kevin O’Leary, formerly of CBC-TV’s Dragon’s Den, has expressed concern about Rachel Notley’s NDP government.

Richard Shotwell/THE CANADIAN PRESS

Rachel Notley has a simple message for Kevin O'Leary: "Bring it on"

The Alberta premier fired back at O'Leary, formerly of CBC-TV's "Dragon's Den," who said he is so concerned about what Notley's NDP government is doing to Alberta's economy, he'll invest $1 million in the oilpatch if she'll quit.

In an interview with a Toronto radio station earlier this week, O'Leary suggested that Notley is in over her head when it comes to developing oil policy and that her government is paralysing investment in the industry.

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He prefaced his comments by saying he meant no disrespect.

Notley shot back at a news conference Tuesday.

"You know, the last time a group of wealthy businessmen tried to tell Alberta voters how to vote, I ended up becoming premier," she quipped.

"So, if now we've got a Toronto wealthy businessman who wants to tell Alberta voters how to vote, I say bring it on."

She was referring to five Alberta corporate leaders with ties to the Progressive Conservatives who held a news conference just before last May's provincial election.

The group, who included University of Alberta board of governors chairman Doug Goss and some CEOs of Alberta-based construction companies, urged voters to "think straight" and questioned why corporations should have to pay more tax.

The five, whom Notley nicknamed "The Monopoly Men," warned against voting for the NDP and complained that businesses always get the short end of the tax stick.

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The premier later cited that news conference as one of the moments she realized that the Tories had misread the electorate and she was going to win.

Notley and her party went on to topple the four decade Tory dynasty on her way to forming a majority government.

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