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British Columbia B.C. terror suspect makes court appearance after arrest in northern town

A sign for the Canadian Security Intelligence Service building is shown in Ottawa, Tuesday, May 14, 2013. The RCMP are to release an update on a national security investigation on Dec. 1, 2013, led by Integrated National Security Enforcement Team in Toronto, which includes officials from the RCMP, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service and the Canada Border Services Agenc

Sean Kilpatric/The Canadian Pre

A northern British Columbia man charged with terrorism-related offences has made his first court appearance.Othman Ayed Hamdan, 33, wore a long-sleeved black T-shirt Monday when he appeared in a Fort St. John courtroom via video conference.

A publication ban was granted on evidence being presented at a bail hearing, and Hamdan is scheduled to appear in provincial court again on Wednesday.

Hamdan is charged with two counts each of counselling to commit murder for the benefit of a terrorist group, counselling to assault causing bodily harm for the benefit of a terrorist group, and counselling to commit aggravated assault for the benefit of a terrorist group.

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RCMP allege he distributed propaganda online involving the group Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, including instructions to commit murder in the name of Jihad.

Court documents show the alleged offences took place between Sept. 22, 2014 and March 21, 2015.

Hamdan was arrested Friday, and is currently in custody.

RCMP said a search warrant was executed at Hamdan's home, and a number of items were seized.

Hamdan's lawyer Bryan Fitzpatrick declined comment on the case after the bail hearing.

Both the mayor of Fort St. John and a spokesman for the town's Muslim association say Hamdan had no known links to the community.

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