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Beer price in the Ultramar gas station in the gas station south of Montreal.

Andre Pichette/The Globe and Mail

British Columbia

Mixed system of public and private, including government liquor stores, private retail stores and brewery retail stores. Some bars are authorized to sell beer, as are some stores in rural communities too small to support a government liquor store.

Alberta

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Fully privatized retailing. Beer is bought in private stores, manufacturer stores and rural grocery stores. Brewpubs and hotels can also sell beer for take-away.

Saskatchewan

A mixed system of government and privately operated outlets (private full-line liquor stores, off-sales and franchises). Bars, restaurants and hotels are able to sell as well.

Manitoba

A mix of public and private. The majority of beer is sold via MLCC Liquor Marts, but there are also some private and rural vendors. In November, the first store in a 10-store pilot program opened at the Winnipeg airport. It's expected that urban grocers will be part of the program, hosting Liquor Mart Express stores.

Ontario

Two retail distributors: the Beer Store and the LCBO. Breweries can sell on-site; a brewery producing more than 25,000 hectolitres per year can have two on-site retail stores, but only if 50 per cent of the beer sold there is produced on-site. Rural areas that can't support a stand-alone LCBO have agency stores.

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Quebec

In Quebec, beer can be purchased at corner and grocery stores and it is the only jurisdiction where you can buy individual cans and bottles from these locations. Some beer listings are also available in the government-run stores (SAQ).

New Brunswick

Beer is sold at 44 government liquor stores and 84 privately owned agency stores. Craft breweries are allowed to sell on premises to the public for off-site consumption.

Nova Scotia

Government NSLC stores and NSLC-authorized private agency stores in rural communities. Craft beers are sold in the handful of private specialty wine stores and at some breweries.

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Prince Edward Island

Beer is sold by 18 PEI Liquor Control Commission retail outlets, many of which are closed on Sundays in the fall and winter. PEILCC also licenses a handful of privately owned agency stores.

Newfoundland and Labrador

Locally brewed beer can be purchased at convenience stores and gas stations. Local and imported beer is available at government-owned liquor stores and private, Liquor Express stores.

Yukon

The Yukon Liquor Corp. has six retail stores and provides Territorial Agent services in five rural communities. Beer can also be purchased from off-sales outlets.

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Northwest Territories

The NWT Liquor Commission operates seven stores. There are also some communities where beer can be purchased from off-sale premises.

Nunavut

The territory proposes to open a beer and wine store in Iqaluit.

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