Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Support quality journalism
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
The Globe and Mail
Support quality journalism
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Globe and Mail website displayed on various devices
Just$1.99
per week
for the first 24 weeks

var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){console.log("scroll");var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1);

Egyptian women demonstrators hold a picture of Shaima al-Sabbagh (C) during a women's demonstration in Cairo on January 29, 2015 protesting the killing of al-Sabbagh who was killed in clashes with Egyptian police during a rare leftwing protest in central Cairo on January 24, 2015.

MOHAMED EL-SHAHED/AFP/Getty Images

Dozens of Egyptian women rallied Thursday to protest the killing of a female protester during a peaceful protest last week, accusing the police of shooting her and demanding her killers be brought to justice.

The Thursday protest was the first public rally against the slaying of 32-year-old activist and mother Shaimaa el-Sabbagh. It followed a storm of criticism of police tactics and of the 2013 protest law that criminalized unauthorized protests, empowering police to deny permits or use force to disperse them.

Since the ouster of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in 2013 after mass protests against him, authorities have cracked down on critics. Thousands have been imprisoned on charges of violating the protest law, while hundreds have been killed in the violent dispersal of rallies.

Story continues below advertisement

The organizers of Thursday's rally defied the protest law by not seeking permission from authorities. The police were out in force, but the demonstration, attended by more than 100 women, ended peacefully.

El-Sabbagh was killed Saturday, on the eve of the fourth anniversary of the uprising that forced longtime autocrat Hosni Mubarak to step down. She and other protesters had demanded policemen be tried for killing demonstrators. The protest Thursday took place at the downtown square where she was killed.

Images of el-Sabbagh, held up by a fellow protester, with blood running down her face, have been widely circulated.

Medical reports said birdshot fired at close range pierced el-Sabbagh's lungs and heart. But officials deny police killed el-Sabbagh. A senior police official told reporters that the images were "inconsequential," and said an investigation is underway.

Holding posters depicting el-Sabbagh's shooting, the women protesters on Thursday chanted "Police are thugs!" and "Down with every president so long as blood is cheap!" A poster carried by most read: "How many more martyrs before victory?"

Nadine Wahab, a protester, said the government is using violence and the protest law to scare people off the streets.

"We are here to show we are not afraid," she said. "We are not just going down for the death of one person, but to save our revolution from the police state and the psychology of terror and fear."

Story continues below advertisement

At one point, a small crowd of pro-government protesters shouted back, chanting "The police are perfect!"

A half hour into the rally, a police officer appealed to the women to disperse.

"We fear for you because we don't want what happened to (el-Sabbagh) to happen to you," the officer told the crowd.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies