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France, Germany mark one of the Second World War's worst atrocities

In 1944, SS troops killed more than 600 French civilians at Oradour-sur-Glane. On Sept. 4, French and German leaders paid tribute to the victims.

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France's President Francois Hollande, left, and German President Joachim Gauck, right, hug after a ceremony at the cemetery of the French martyr village of Oradour-sur-Glane, southwestern France, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2013. Holding hands in quiet tribute, the presidents of Germany and France are visiting the scene of the largest massacre in Nazi-occupied France nearly seven decades ago.

Phillipe Wojazer/AP

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French President Francois Hollande's companion Valerie Trierweiler, left, and German President Joachim Gauck's partner Daniela Schadt attend a ceremony at the cemetery of the French martyr village of Oradour-sur-Glane, southwestern France, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2013.

Philippe Wojazer/AP

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France's President Francois Hollande, left, and German President Joachim Gauck, right, comfort Robert Hebras, 88, one of the last survivors of the World War II Oradour-sur-Glane's massacre, as they visit the ruins of the church of Oradour-sur-Glane, southwestern France, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2013.

Philippe Wojazer/AP

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French President Francois Hollande (2ndR), German President Joachim Gauck (L), massacre survivor Robert Hebras (2ndL) and Mayor of Oradour-sur-Glane, Raymond Fugier, walk in the streets of the French martyr village of Oradour-sur-Glane, near Limoges, September 4, 2013. Six hundred forty-two inhabitants of Oradour-sur-Glane, men, women and children, were massacred by soldiers of a German Waffen-SS Panzer division who also destroyed the entire village on June 10, 1944. A new village was built nearby after the war, but the remains of the original village has been maintained as a permanent World War II memorial and museum.

POOL/REUTERS

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France's President Francois Hollande, right, German President Joachim Gauck, left, and Robert Hebras, 88, one of the last survivors of the World War II Oradour-sur-Glane's massacre, center, walk in the streets of the French martyr village of Oradour-sur-Glane, southwestern France, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2013.

Phillipe Wojazer/AP

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French President Francois Hollande (R), German President Joachim Gauck (L) and massacre survivor Robert Hebras stand in the church of the French martyr village of Oradour-sur-Glane, near Limoges, September 4, 2013.

POOL/REUTERS

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France's President Francois Hollande, left, and German President Joachim Gauck, right, hold hands after a ceremony at the cemetery of the French martyr village of Oradour-sur-Glane, southwestern France, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2013.

Phillipe Wojazer/AP

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French President Francois Hollande (2ndR), German President Joachim Gauck (L), massacre survivor Robert Hebras (2ndL) and Mayor of Oradour-sur-Glane, Raymond Fugier, walk in the streets of the French martyr village of Oradour-sur-Glane, near Limoges, September 4, 2013.

POOL/REUTERS

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France's President Francois Hollande, left, and German President Joachim Gauck, right, comfort Robert Hebras, 88, one of the last survivors of the World War II Oradour-sur-Glane's massacre, as they visit the ruins of the church, in Oradour-sur-Glane, southwestern France, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2013. Holding hands in quiet tribute, the presidents of Germany and France are visiting the scene of the largest massacre in Nazi-occupied France nearly seven decades ago.

Jean Pierre Muller/AP

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