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The answer: both, according to some entrepreneurial residents. Photos by Affan Chowdhry

Hotel manager Sajjad Akhtar explains how a bridge across the Neelum river connects Pakistan-controlled Kashmir (right) and Indian-controlled Kashmir. Twice a month, villagers - often family relations - are permitted to meet on the bridge under supervision of Pakistani and Indian soldiers, he says.

Affan Chowdhry/The Globe and Mail

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Sajjad Akhtar gestures toward Indian-controlled Kashmir.

Affan Chowdhry/The Globe and Mail

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A view from Upper Neelum village during late afternoon.

Affan Chowdhry/The Globe and Mail

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Rehmat Khan stands outside his guest house in Upper Neelum village.

Affan Chowdhry/The Globe and Mail

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Rehmat Khan shows one of the rooms in his guest house in Upper Neelum village.

Affan Chowdhry/The Globe and Mail

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A view of one of the rooms in Rehmat Khan’s guest house in Upper Neelum village.

Affan Chowdhry/The Globe and Mail

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Sections of the Neelum valley, en route to Sharda.

Affan Chowdhry/The Globe and Mail

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A view across the Neelum valley from Pakistani-controlled Kashmir. The Line of Control in this part of the valley is basically the river - everything to the right, including the huts and homes on the valley floor is Indian-controlled Kashmir.

Affan Chowdhry/The Globe and Mail

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More scenes from the Neelum valley, en route to Sharda.

Affan Chowdhry/The Globe and Mail

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A cornfield by the main road running through Neelum valley.

Affan Chowdhry/The Globe and Mail

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