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The family home of late Toronto mayor Rob Ford has been listed for sale with an asking price of $2.499-million.

The one-storey, three-bedroom house at 223 Edenbridge Dr., a winding street in Etobicoke, currently stands empty. During Mr. Ford’s tenure as mayor from 2010 to 2014, the white-brick bungalow was frequently the backdrop for media scrums as Mr. Ford became embroiled in a substance-abuse scandal. Televisions crews often camped out at the end of the driveway.

Real-estate agent Mike Donia of RE/MAX Realty Specialists Inc. is selling the house on behalf of Mr. Ford’s widow, Renata Ford, and her two children.

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Mr. Donia says the house, which has been on the market for a few days, has attracted a fair amount of interest. He thinks the fact the former mayor lived in the home will add to its cachet.

“It’s probably a positive because a lot of people loved him,” he said.

Showings will be by appointment only.

Mr. Donia said the “well-kept family home” may appeal to a family or an investor who could rent it out for $5,000 to $6,000 a month. “That neighbourhood rents in three seconds,” he said.

The interior has been freshly painted, and the house has had about $80,000 in recent upgrades, he added. “It’s all renovated and it’s very livable.”

He says the more likely outcome is that the 80-by-119-foot lot will appeal to a builder who will tear down the house and build a more palatial home in an area where new houses are selling for as much as $8-million. He says a builder could pay the asking price, spend $2-million on construction and still turn a profit.

The property is bordered on two sides by parkland in James Gardens, which offers tennis courts and walking trails along the Humber River in Toronto’s west end.

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Mr. Ford was first elected to city council to represent Ward 2 – Etobicoke North in 2000.

He was diagnosed with cancer in September, 2014, and died in March, 2016.

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