Skip to main content

Report On Business Canadian auto plants shut out of key quality ranking for second straight year

Ford and Lincoln vehicles are parked outside the Oakville Assembly Plant in this file photo.

CHRIS HELGREN/REUTERS

Canadian vehicle assembly plants have been shut out for the second straight year in a closely watched survey of auto industry quality, potentially eroding one of this country's competitive advantages in trying to lure new automotive investment.

U.S. assembly plants captured the top three spots in the annual J.D. Power and Associates initial quality survey, while a Toyota Motor Corp. factory in Japan won the platinum award for the plant producing vehicles with the fewest defects.

A General Motors Corp. pickup truck plant in Fort Wayne, Ind., topped the North American rankings, while Toyota plants in Georgetown, Ky., grabbed the silver and bronze awards.

Story continues below advertisement

Prior to this year, plants in Ontario – where all passenger vehicle manufacturing in Canada is performed – captured 29 awards, compared with 31 for U.S. plants. There are eight assembly plants in Canada and more than 40 in the United States.

Some vehicles assembled in Canada ranked among the highest-quality vehicles in their segments, including the GMC Terrain and Chevrolet Equinox assembled in Ingersoll, Ont., the Toyota Corolla, which is made in plants in Canada and the United States and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV Dodge Challengers made in Brampton, Ont., and Chrysler Pacifica and Dodge Grand Caravan minivans made in Windsor, Ont.

The overall quality of new vehicles is higher than it has ever been and improved 8 per cent from the 2016 survey, J.D. Power said Wednesday in releasing the results.

The annual survey measures the number of problems reported by consumers during the first 90 days of ownership. Auto makers are ranked by the number of problems experienced per 100 vehicles

The overall quality leader was Kia Motors with 72 problems per 100 vehicles. The industry average was 97 problems for every 100 vehicles.

Auto makers are responding to driver feedback, Dave Sargent, vice-president of the automotive practice at J.D. Power said in a statement.

"The industry has improved in each of the past three years," Mr. Sargent noted. "Today's vehicles have more things that could go wrong, but fewer things that actually do go wrong."

Story continues below advertisement

Technology issues still dominate consumer complaints, the consulting firm said, but also represented a category where new vehicle owners reported fewer problems than in previous years.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Tickers mentioned in this story
Unchecking box will stop auto data updates
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter