Skip to main content

Energy and Resources Five people taken to hospital after explosion at Rio Tinto facility in Quebec

A sign adorns the building where mining company Rio Tinto has its office in Perth, Western Australia.

David Gray/REUTERS

Five people that were taken to hospital Thursday morning after an explosion at the Rio Tinto iron and titanium plant in Sorel-Tracy, Que., have been released.

Company spokeswoman Claudine Gagnon says the workers were treated for shock at the hospital and discharged.

The cause of the explosion involving carbon monoxide gas used in the production process is under investigation.

Story continues below advertisement

The explosion, which happened at about 4:30 a.m. ET, caused heavy damage at a section of the metallurgical complex northeast of Montreal.

One section of the facility resumed production Thursday afternoon with four others set to gradually come on stream in the evening.

In total, about 1,400 people work at the complex. Gagnon said there were 192 people at work at the time of the incident.

Rio Tinto is one of the world's leading metals and mining firms with about 50,000 workers in some 35 countries.

The Quebec operation manufactures raw materials for the titanium dioxide markets and produces high purity metal powders and pig iron.

Last year, the company announced it would spend $16 million to retrofit one of the furnaces at the metallurgical complex.

Report an error
Tickers mentioned in this story
Unchecking box will stop auto data updates
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter