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Taiwan erased an early four-run deficit to defeat Canada 6-4 on Thursday in the super-round finale for both teams at the women’s baseball World Cup.

The result means Canada, the defending silver medallists at the biennial tournament, will play the United States for bronze on Friday while Taiwan advanced to the gold-medal game against Japan.

Canada, ranked No. 2 in the world behind the powerhouse Japanese, had opened the game with a four-run first inning on an error and RBIs from Amanda Asay (two) and Kate Psota.

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But Taiwan replied with three runs in the bottom of the first, and three more in the third as the Canadians committed two errors.

Elizabeth Gilder started for Canada but didn’t record an out. She allowed three runs, three hits, one walk and hit a batter before being replaced by Hannah Martensen.

Martensen went three innings, allowing three more runs, and Claire Eccles closed out the game with three shutout frames.

Japan, which has won 29 straight games en route to five consecutive World Cups titles, beat Venezuela 10-0 earlier Thursday.

The No. 3 U.S. played No. 13 Dominican Republic in the late game.

The Americans won the first two installments of the tournament in 2004 and 2006 before giving way to Japan’s dominance. Canada has five medals from the previous seven tournaments — three bronze and two silvers.

The U.S. beat Canada 5-1 on Wednesday night in second-round action, handing the Canadians their second loss at the tournament. They also lost 2-1 to Japan in the opening round last week.

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This is the last World Cup for Canadian manager Andre Lachance, who has skipped the team in each of the eight tournaments since its inception in ‘04 in Edmonton. Veterans Ashley Stephenson of Mississauga, Ont., and Psota of Burlington, Ont., could also leave the team after eight World Cup appearances each.

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