Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); }

FILE - In this Feb. 20, 2020, file photo, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, left, walks with Saudi ambassador to the United States Princess Reema Bint Bandar at Princess Reema's Palace in Riyadh. With Joe Biden re-emerging as the front-runner in the Democratic presidential race, Saudi Arabia's ambassador to the United States dismisses Biden's description of the kingdom as a "pariah."

Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the U.S. dismissed the top two Democratic presidential contenders’ criticisms of her country, saying Thursday that candidates’ opinions tend to change once they become president.

Princess Reema bint Bandar Al Saud shrugged off both Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden saying last year that the U.S.-Saudi relationship should be changed.

“I’ve always found that, many times, once a president gets to the White House, when they see a 360 (degree) effect, opinions can change,” Reema said during an interview with The Associated Press in Wyoming. “And so I will never comment on an election — it’s not our place — but I look forward to working with whoever’s in the White House.”

Story continues below advertisement

In a November debate of Democratic candidates, Biden called Saudi Arabia a “pariah” when referring to the 2018 killing of U.S.-based journalist Jamal Khashoggi in the Saudi consulate in Istanbul.

Sanders also has been critical of Saudi Arabia, calling it in the same debate a “brutal dictatorship” that treats women as “third-class citizens.”

The killing of Khashoggi, who wrote columns for the Washington Post critical of the Saudi government under Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, provoked outrage and condemnation in the U.S., which has been a staunch ally.

Reema became ambassador to the U.S. in 2019 amid efforts by Saudi Arabia to improve its relationship with the United States after Khashoggi’s slaying.

Reema was in Wyoming to seek political and economic ties with a major producer of oil and natural gas that has been struggling with fossil fuels’ weak markets and uncertain outlook, much like Saudi Arabia.

She also drew a comparison ahead of International Women’s Day on Sunday between recent women’s rights advancements in Saudi Arabia — where women are now allowed to drive vehicles — and Wyoming, which as a territory in 1869 became the first U.S. state or territory to give women the right to vote.

“If I want to be a thriving nation, if I want to be a thriving state, if I want to be a global player, certain things must happen,” Reema said. “And the focus on women’s rights in my country is not because somebody on the outside told us, ‘You must so this.’ It’s because 50% of our community, if you’d like a thriving economy, must participate.”

This content appears as provided to The Globe by the originating wire service. It has not been edited by Globe staff.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies