Skip to main content

This picture taken on August 3, 2019 shows residential buildings (foreground) overlooking barges and ships at a typhoon shelter in Hong Kong's Victoria Harbour.

ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP/Getty Images

A powerful typhoon will hit Taiwan later on Thursday, bringing the risk of landslides and high seas, weather forecasters said, hours after a 6.0-magnitude earthquake struck the island.

Typhoon Lekima, categorised at the strongest typhoon level by Taiwan’s weather bureau, was expected to approach off the island’s northeastern coast late on Thursday. It was moving across the ocean in a north-northwesterly direction at 15 km per hour (9 mph), weather officials said.

Lekima was carrying maximum winds of 227 km per hour (141 mph) as it approaches Taiwan, the weather bureau said.

Story continues below advertisement

The bureau issued wind and rain warnings for greater Taipei, the northern port city of Keelung and other northern counties. It also put out a warning to seafarers off the south and east coasts.

A 6.0-magnitude earthquake struck off Taiwan’s northeastern coast earlier on Thursday, prompting warnings of landslides as the weather bureau forecast rainfall of up to 900 millimeters (35 inches) in the island’s northern mountains.

“An earthquake struck when we are making preparations for the typhoon, which is a rare event,” premier Su Tseng-chang told a meeting at a national emergency center, urging authorities to stay on alert when the storm approaches.

The earthquake cut power to more than 10,000 buildings and a woman was killed by a falling wardrobe.

More than 1,500 people were moved to safety, most of them tourists on islands off its east coast, while troops were deployed in some areas amid fears of floods.

The storm will proceed to China, approaching its eastern city of Shanghai over the weekend, the weather bureau said.

Typhoons regularly hit Taiwan, China, the Philippines and Japan in the second half of the year, gathering strength from the warm waters of the Pacific Ocean or South China Sea before weakening over land.

Story continues below advertisement

Typhoon Morakot devastated the island in 2009, killing nearly 700 people, most of them in landslides.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Cannabis pro newsletter