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World In photos: Wildfires in northern and southern California wreak havoc

Vehicles and a home are in ruins, one of at least 20 homes that were lost on Windermere Drive in the Point Dume area of Malibu, Calif., Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018. Known as the Woolsey Fire, it has consumed tens of thousands of acres and destroyed dozens of homes. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

Reed Saxon/The Associated Press

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A man who gave his first name as John, background, looks over the ruins of his home, one of at least 20 homes destroyed just on Windermere Drive in the Point Dume area of Malibu, Calif., Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018. Known as the Woolsey Fire, it has consumed tens of thousands of acres and destroyed dozens of homes. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

Reed Saxon/The Associated Press

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Ventura County Sheriff's Office Capt. Garo Kuredjian, left, embraces chaplains with the Billy Graham Rapid Response Team (RRT) as they pray near the site of Wednesday's mass shooting in Thousand Oaks, Calif., Friday Nov. 9, 2018. Investigators continue to work to figure out why an ex-Marine opened fire Wednesday evening inside a Southern California country music bar, killing multiple people. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Damian Dovarganes/The Associated Press

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Sheriff's deputies recover the remains of Camp Fire victims on Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018, in Paradise, Calif.. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

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A fallen power line is seen on top of burnt out vehicles on the side of the road in Paradise, California after the Camp fire tore through the area on November 10, 2018. - Firefighters in California on November 10 battled raging blazes at both ends of the state that have left at least nine people dead and thousands of homes destroyed, but there was little hope of containing the flames anytime soon. So far, all nine fatalities were reported in the town of Paradise, in Butte County, where more than 6,700 buildings, most of them residences, have been consumed by the late-season inferno, which is now California's most destructive fire on record. (Photo by Josh Edelson / AFP)JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images

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Firefighters Jason Toole, right, and Brent McGill with the Santa Barbara Fire Dept. walk among the ashes of a wildfire-ravaged home after turning off an open gas line on the property Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018, in Malibu, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

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Equine veterinarian Jesse Jellison carries an injured goose to a waiting transport during the Camp Fire in Paradise, California, U.S. November 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stephen Lam

STEPHEN LAM/Reuters

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Yuba and Butte County Sheriff deputies walk on a street after recovering a deceased victim during the Camp fire in Paradise, California, U.S. November 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stephen Lam

STEPHEN LAM/Reuters

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El Dorado County Sheriff's deputy Paul Zierke conducts a welfare check at a burned out home during the Camp Fire in Paradise, California, U.S. November 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stephen Lam

STEPHEN LAM/Reuters

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Melted metal from an abandoned car destroyed by the Camp Fire is seen in Paradise, California, U.S. November 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stephen Lam

STEPHEN LAM/Reuters

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ATTENTION EDITORS - VISUAL COVERAGE OF SCENES OF INJURY OR DEATH Yuba and Butte County Sheriff deputies carry a body bag with a deceased victim during the Camp fire in Paradise, California, U.S. November 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stephen Lam

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Horses are tied up at lifeguard stations on Zuma Beach, brought there by their owners to escape the Woolsey Fire, in Malibu, California, November 10, 2018, before being transported to a facility outside the fire zone. - Firefighters in California on November 10 battled raging blazes at both ends of the state that have left at least nine people dead and thousands of homes destroyed, but there was little hope of containing the flames anytime soon. The Ventura County Fire Department said the "Woolsey Fire" had burned around 35,000 acres, was not contained, and that evacuation orders were issued for some 88,000 homes in the county and neighboring Los Angeles County. (Photo by Robyn Beck / AFP)ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

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Firefighters gather for a morning briefing during the Camp Fire in Paradise, California, U.S. November 10, 2018. REUTERS/Stephen Lam

STEPHEN LAM/Reuters

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A burned out Jack In The Box restaurant is seen in downtown Paradise, California, after the Camp fire tore through on November 10, 2018. - Firefighters in California on November 10 battled raging blazes at both ends of the state that have left at least nine people dead and thousands of homes destroyed, but there was little hope of containing the flames anytime soon. So far, all nine fatalities were reported in the town of Paradise, in Butte County, where more than 6,700 buildings, most of them residences, have been consumed by the late-season inferno, which is now California's most destructive fire on record. (Photo by Josh Edelson / AFP)JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images

JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images

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Firefighters spray foam on hot embers along a hillside near homes on Latigo Canyon Road in Malibu, California, on November 10, 2018, as the fight against the Woolsey Fire continues. - Firefighters in California on November 10 battled raging blazes at both ends of the state that have left at least nine people dead and thousands of homes destroyed, but there was little hope of containing the flames anytime soon. The Ventura County Fire Department said the "Woolsey Fire" had burned around 35,000 acres, was not contained, and that evacuation orders were issued for some 88,000 homes in the county and neighboring Los Angeles County. (Photo by Frederic J. BROWN / AFP)FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

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Molten aluminum has flowed from a car that burned in front of one of at least 20 homes destroyed just on Windermere Drive in the Point Dume area of Malibu, Calif., Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018. Known as the Woolsey Fire, it has consumed thousands of acres and destroyed dozens of homes. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

Reed Saxon/The Associated Press

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A helicopter drops water as the Woolsey Fire continues to burn in Malibu, California, U.S. November 10, 2018. REUTERS/Eric Thayer

ERIC THAYER/Reuters

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MALIBU, CA - NOVEMBER 10: Los Angeles County firefighters attack flames approaching the Salvation Army camps in Malibu Creek State Park during the Woolsey Fire on November 10, 2018 near Malibu, California. The Woolsey fire has burned over 70,000 acres and has reached the Pacific Coast at Malibu as it continues grow. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

David McNew/Getty Images

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Krystin Harvey, left, comforts her daughter Araya Cipollini at the remains of their home burned in the Camp Fire, Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018, in Paradise, Calif. The blaze that started Thursday outside the hilly town of Paradise has grown and destroyed more than 6,700 buildings, almost all of them homes, making it California's most destructive wildfire since record-keeping began. But crews have made gains and the fire is partially contained, officials said Saturday. (AP Photo/John Locher)

John Locher/The Associated Press

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