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FILE PHOTO: Gov. Gavin Newsom signs one of the budget trailer bills at Sacramento City College in Sacramento, Calif., Monday, July 1, 2019. Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a bill into law on Tuesday that makes low-income adults age 25 and younger eligible for the state’s Medicaid program regardless of their immigration status.

The Associated Press

California has become the first state to offer taxpayer-funded health benefits to young adults living in the country illegally.

Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a bill into law on Tuesday that makes low-income adults age 25 and younger eligible for the state’s Medicaid program regardless of their immigration status.

State officials expect the plan to cover about 90,000 people and cost taxpayers US$98-million. California already covers children ages 18 and younger regardless of immigration status.

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The law will not give health insurance benefits to everyone 25 and younger, but only those whose income is low enough to qualify.

Newsom and Democratic legislative leaders say they plan to further expand coverage to more adults in the years to come. Republican President Donald Trump has called the move “crazy .”

Advocates of the measure say it’s a way to improve the health of immigrants in the state by providing them with access to the medical care they need.

Many immigrants who are in the country illegally are already enrolled for some government-funded programs, but they only cover emergencies and pregnancies.

Democrats had pushed to expand the coverage to even more adults, but Newsom rejected the proposals, saying it would cost about US$3.4-billion to provide coverage to all California adults living in the country illegally. But he has vowed to keep expanding coverage in future years.

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