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Our Prototypes column introduces new vehicle concepts and presents visuals from designers who illustrate the ideas. Some of them will be extensions of existing concepts, others will be new, some will be production ready, and others really far-fetched.

Images by Xavier Gordillo, provided by Charles Bombardier

The concept

The MUJÏN is a futuristic electric stroller concept which requires no driver. MUJÏN would be similar to the current strollers parents use in North America, but adapted to follow them when they travel by foot in the neighbourhood. Each MUJÏN would be paired with its baby and parent, and it would only follow orders given by the parents to assist them all day in taking a little extra care of their baby.

The background

Today’s strollers haven’t evolved much. Parents everywhere know the hassle of either bending over a stroller or accidentally kicking the wheels while they walk or jog. You have to hold onto it all the time, so if you want to walk the dog or help another child while you’re walking with the stroller, it can get tricky.

Why not use new technologies to improve strollers and ease the daily lives of millions of parents? Using a machine with babies is always a challenge for engineers, but I am sure a safe electric stroller could be developed. I asked Xavier Gordillo to conceptualise this idea by taking inspiration from the robotic wheelchair invented by Dean Kamen, which can also climb stairs.

How it works

Ion lithium batteries would power the Mujïn, delivering power to its four wheels. It would have four-wheel-drive for extra traction and safety, and a foldable roof/shade screen made of flexible solar panels could help charge the batteries. The Mujïn could also save up to 25 per cent of its energy by using regenerative braking.

This autonomous stroller would feature a driverless system that would ride at low speeds and stay just behind or just ahead of the parent, based on their preferences. It would work similarly to the Volkswagen stroller prototype. The Mujïn would be equipped with cameras, warning systems, and a lot of back-up safety measures. It could also be driven by an adult in manual mode.

The stair climbing system would need to be developed further. We thought about using a system similar to the Ibot wheelchair and having the wheels rotate going upstairs or downstairs. The trick is to maintain balance at all times. Parents will probably want to keep their hands on the Mujïn while it’s climbing or descending stairs but the Mujïn could accomplish this on it’s own too. It would also be possible to use the Mujïn like a conventional stroller.

What it’s used for

The Mujïn would obviously serve to carry your baby around anytime during the day. The vehicle could feature music, a wireless or Bluetooth camera system, a vibration mode to soothe the baby, and even a way to gently heat the crib or cool it down. Finally, the Mujïn could also be used to transport other items like groceries or shopping bags.

The designer

I would like to thank Xavier Gordillo who created the images of the MUJÏN concept. Gordillo lives near Blansko, Czech Republic. He studied Car Design at the Europe Design Institute (IED), and he works as a Freelance Industrial Designer. He also created the images of the Pixi transparent bus and the Gemini twin deck bus.

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