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For many, moving to a new country can be quite a challenge. Add working towards a post-secondary education and that challenge becomes even greater,” says Nova Scotia Community College (NSCC) president Don Bureaux.

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More than two-thirds of Canada’s national population growth is attributed to immigration, with newcomers joining the workforce and fuelling the country’s economy.

In recognition of the valuable contribution of immigrants, refugees and international students, Canada’s colleges and institutes are working to expand their capacity to welcome them and build support systems to aid their success.

“For many, moving to a new country can be quite a challenge. Add working towards a post-secondary education and that challenge becomes even greater,” says Nova Scotia Community College (NSCC) president Don Bureaux.

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NSCC provides international students access to a free app, which gives them helpful information about their new environment both before and after their arrival. “Innovations like this mobile app support students as they navigate a new chapter in their lives and help to ensure they get the most out of their experience at NSCC,” he adds.

The number of students coming from outside Canada to colleges and institutes is growing, says Denise Amyot, president and CEO of Colleges and Institutes Canada. In 2006-07, foreign students made up four per cent of the enrolment in the college system; by 2015-16, this number had grown to eight per cent.

Helping to attract newcomers are immigration policy changes, which have sped up visa processing times, permitted foreign students to work in Canada while they study, and improved graduates’ chances of obtaining Canadian permanent residency, says Ms. Amyot.


Produced by Randall Anthony Communications. The Globe’s editorial department was not involved in its creation.

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