Skip to main content

Actor Jon Cryer arrives for the Entertainment Weekly Comic Con party at the Hard Rock Hotel in San Diego, Calif., on July 20, 2019.

CHRIS DELMAS/AFP/Getty Images

An actor is sharing his gratitude towards a Vancouver service specializing in finding lost rings after losing his own wedding band, kicking off a panicked search attempt.

Jon Cryer, known for his role in the television series Two and a Half Men, was walking along Vancouver’s seawall to meet up with castmates, on Friday when he lost his wedding ring.

“I pulled my hand out of my pocket and heard a ‘ping!’ To my left. I walked a couple more steps and realized my wedding ring was gone...,” he wrote on Twitter.

Story continues below advertisement

Cryer said he frantically searched for the missing wedding band but rain and a lack of working lamp posts hindered his efforts.

Losing the ring was especially hard, due to COVID-19 travel restrictions restricting him from seeing his wife regularly while filming in Vancouver, he wrote.

He returned Saturday to search through a muddy section of grass he believed the ring could be in, but didn’t have any luck.

Cryer turned to a company called the Ring Finders, that specialize in searching for rings and other lost valuables, to help him in his quest.

“In my mind, I’m thinking ‘there’s a 95 per cent chance it was probably dropped where someone could’ve seen it’,” said Chris Turner, who founded the company in 2009.

But the pair were lucky.

Turner says it took him three minutes to locate the ring using a metal detector.

Story continues below advertisement

The ring was found buried in a clump of grass near to where Cryer had searched on Saturday.

“This one surprised me. The odds of that ring making it to the grass, not only the grass, the deepest part of the grass ... I was just astonished. I was like ‘the gods are on his side for sure’,” he said.

Cryer said he’s stunned at how quickly the ring was found.

“I’m still beside myself,” he wrote on Twitter.

Our Morning Update and Evening Update newsletters are written by Globe editors, giving you a concise summary of the day’s most important headlines. Sign up today.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies