Skip to main content

This innovative way of delivering babies by C-section, emphasizing skin-to-skin contact and bonding between mother and baby, is being led in Canada by physicians at Sunnybrook.

Jessica Ganas shares a special moment with her moments-old daughter Juliana, who was born via a skin-to-skin Caesarean section earlier this year. This innovative way of delivering babies by C-section, emphasizing skin-to-skin contact and bonding between mother and baby, is being led in Canada by physicians at Sunnybrook.

Babies born by C-section are typically given to their mothers three-to-five minutes after birth, after being cleaned off and receiving routine care. In a skin-to-skin C-section, the baby is put directly on the mother's upper abdomen after the medical team pushes the baby underneath the drape separating the medical team from the mother's upper body. The baby then settles directly on the mother's bare chest.

"Skin-to-skin contact immediately after birth helps babies regulate their temperature and glucose levels. It promotes bonding, and babies often initiate breastfeeding on their own from that position as well," says Dr. Jon Barrett, left, seen here with Dr. Kirsten Niles and registered nurse Andrea Pryce.


This content was produced by The Globe and Mail's advertising department, in consultation with Sunnybrook. The Globe's editorial department was not involved in its creation.