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brexit
Britain's Home Secretary, Theresa May, is applauded as she makes a statement outside the Palace of Westminster, in London, after she won 199 votes for the Conservative leadership, Thursday July 7, 2016. Andrea Leadsom took 84 votes and Michael Gove took 46, meaning the UK's next prime minister will be a woman. (Jonathan Brady/PA via AP)

Britain’s Home Secretary, Theresa May, is applauded as she makes a statement outside the Palace of Westminster, in London, after she won 199 votes for the Conservative leadership, Thursday July 7, 2016. Andrea Leadsom took 84 votes and Michael Gove took 46, meaning the UK’s next prime minister will be a woman. (Jonathan Brady/PA via AP)

Who is Theresa May? Britain's new Prime Minister at a glance

Theresa May is the only remaining candidate to be the new leader of Britain's ruling Conservative Party after Andrea Leadsom dropped out of the race on Monday morning.

Here's a quick introduction to Britain's new prime minister:

MEET:
Theresa May
Position
Remain or Leave?
Age
Education
Home Secretary and Member of Parliament
Remain
59
Geography at St. Hugh’s College, Oxford

Foray into politics


Ms. May first entered politics in 1986 as a councillor in the London borough of Merton – a position she held until 1994.

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In 1997, she was elected to parliament as the Conservative member for Maidenhead, a town in Berkshire county about an hour outside of London. Since joining parliament she has held numerous positions, such as Shadow Secretary of State for Education and Employment, Shadow Secretary of State for the Family and Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Women and Equalities, among others.

She was appointed Home Secretary in 2010, making her the longest-serving home secretary in more than 50 years.


Read Paul Waldie's full profile of the new leader:


This file photo taken on June 27, 2016 shows British Home Secretary Theresa May walking through the door of 10 Downing Street after attending a cabinet meeting.

This file photo taken on June 27, 2016 shows British Home Secretary Theresa May walking through the door of 10 Downing Street after attending a cabinet meeting.

AFP PHOTO / LEON NEALLEON NEAL/AFP/Getty Images


Before politics


Before entering politics, Ms. May worked at the Bank of England and at the Association for Payment Clearing Services as the Head of European Affairs Unit and as a Senior Adviser of International Affairs.


Personal life


Ms. May is the only child of an Anglican church minister.

She met her husband, Philip May, now a stock broker, at Oxford and they were married in 1980 by her father.

Her father died in a car crash the following year and then her mother, who had multiple sclerosis, died a few months later.

In 2013 she announced she has Type 1 diabetes, which she controls with four insulin injections a day. She has also talked publicly about the agony she and her husband felt at being unable to have children.

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British Home Secretary Theresa May is shown in London on May 12, 2015.

British Home Secretary Theresa May is shown in London on May 12, 2015.

SUZANNE PLUNKETT/REUTERS


Where she stands on key issues


On Britain's leadership, as told to the BBC:

(It is) nothing less than the patriotic duty of our party to unite and to govern in the best interests of the whole country. We need a bold, new positive vision for the future of our country - a country that works not for a privileged few but for every one of us

On Brexit:

I couldn’t be clearer. Brexit means Brexit and we’re going to make a success of it.There will be no attempts to remain inside the EU.

On free movement, according to The Telegraph:

If I am prime minister we will come out of the European Union and part of that will be control of free movement. But alongside that it's important to show how we can come through what will be I think some difficult times with a better, brighter future.

With files from Paul Waldie and Terra Ciolfe


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