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Globe Investor Dividend hikes, prime pipeline stocks and Carrick’s robo-adviser guide: What you need to know this week in investing

Looking for investing ideas? Here’s your weekly digest of the Globe’s latest insights and analysis from the pros, stock tips, portfolio strategies plus what investors need to know for the week ahead.



Why these five companies just gave dividend investors an early holiday gift

As third-quarter earnings rolled in, many companies – including several in my model Yield Hog Dividend Growth Portfolio – have taken the opportunity to hike their payments to shareholders, John Heinzl writes. I welcome these “gifts," not only because they put more cash in my pocket but because they send a strong signal about a company’s financial health. Here’s a look at Telus, Manulife and three other companies that increased their dividends in recent weeks.

Related: These 14 TSX dividend stocks have stellar credit ratings and are positioned to weather the next crisis

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Read more John Heinzl: Canopy Growth, Apple and more of this week’s investing stars and dogs

The demise of pipeline stocks is vastly exaggerated. Here’s why now is a perfect time to invest

Investors have soured on pipelines in part because of the controversies they generate, but also because they are notoriously interest-sensitive. As a result, their share prices have been sinking as rates move higher at an increasing pace. But Gordon Pape believes there is still life in this sector, for several reasons, including continued profitability and expansion plans: “In the short run, we may see more weakness in the share price. But these are sound companies that offer long-term growth potential and attractive, increasing cash flow. Buy them while they’re cheap.”

Rob Carrick’s 2018 robo-adviser guide: Find the right firm for you

Financial giants including banks and insurance companies are investing in robo-advisers because they recognize there’s a need for a low-cost advisory service that helps investors build and manage their portfolios online, Rob Carrick writes. A robo-adviser is an online service that helps you develop a personalized portfolio mix of stocks and bonds and then builds it for you with low-cost exchange-traded funds. The Globe and Mail robo-adviser guide is designed to show what’s available in the robo-world – the firms, the fees, the investment approaches and more. This year’s roster of robos include Mylo and Planswell, which are financial apps that offer a robo-adviser as part of their overall services.

Read more Rob Carrick: Let’s see if buying a house is the cure for sky-high rents

CIBC becomes the last of the major banks to launch its own ETFs

Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce is the last of the major Canadian banks to enter the exchange-traded funds industry with plans to launch four new offerings, Clare O’Hara writes. CIBC Asset Management filed with regulators this past Wednesday for two actively managed fixed-income funds and two smart-beta equity funds. CIBC has been active in the industry as a sub-adviser to several ETFs from other providers, but this is the first set of proprietary exchange-traded funds that it has launched. With management fees between 0.3 per cent and 0.4 per cent, the four ETFs are: CIBC Active Investment Grade Floating Rate Bond ETF, CIBC Active Investment Grade Corporate Bond ETF, CIBC Multifactor Canadian Equity ETF and CIBC Multifactor U.S. Equity ETF.

Read more: Three top stock picks from three of Canada’s top money managers

The stock of the ‘smartest company in the world’ gets bludgeoned

Scott Barlow wrote about graphics processor unit (GPU) maker NVIDIA Corp. last year after it was named “smartest company in the world” by the M.I.T. Technology review, and he proposed it as a benchmark for the development of artificial intelligence. As it turns out, in the short term, it was more of a benchmark for the cryptocurrency mania and implosion, he writes – the stock was bludgeoned on weak results after GPU demand for cryptomining collapsed. NVIDIA stock closed Friday at US$164.43, down 20 per cent for the week.

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Read more: Bitcoin plunges to below key support, more than one-year low

What investors need to know for the week ahead

U.S. markets will be closed Thursday for Thanksgiving. Companies reporting earnings this week include Best Buy, George Weston, Lowe’s, TJX Cos., Target, Deere & Co. Metro and Dollar Tree. Economic data on tap: U.S. building permits and housing starts for October (Tuesday); Canada’s economic and fiscal update, Canadian wholesale trade for September and U.S. durable goods orders and existing home sales for October (Wednesday); Canada’s inflation figures for October and retail sales for September (Friday).

Looking for more investing ideas and opinions?

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From junk to investment-grade: Why investors should be watching these five companies

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